Skip to content

Jellyfish

Jellyfish Spilt Milk

San Francisco’s Jellyfish were under appreciated at the time, but have since gained a devoted following. They’re classified as a power pop band, but they bring just the right amount of sincerity to feel grounded, without sacrificing the fun that power pop needs to work. They’re notable for their ornate arrangements, especially on 1993’s Spilt Milk, where their harmonies are reminiscent of The Beach Boys or Queen. Jellyfish were also notable for their live shows, where lead singer and drummer Andy Sturmer performed with a standing drum kit. The group’s other constant member was keyboardist Roger Joseph Manning Jr; the pair had previously played together in Beatnik Beatch.

Unfortunately, Jellyfish only released two albums, and 1990’s Bellybutton essentially feels like a warm-up for Spilt Milk. I also have a 20 song compilation, but I don’t think it’s worth covering despite a few interesting b-sides – it’s more satisfying to hear their two albums in their entirety. But despite their small discography, I’ve given them a dedicated page, and I also have solo albums by Jason Faulkner, who played guitar on Bellybutton, and Roger Joseph Manning Jr, which I’ll cover sometime.

 

Jellyfish Album Reviews

Bellybutton

Jellyfish Bellybutton1990, 7.5/10
Jellyfish were formed by the songwriting partnership of Roger Manning and Andy Sturmer, after their previous band Beatnik Beatch didn’t allow them to contribute songs. Their 1990 debut, Bellybutton, synthesises influences like XTC, The Beatles, and Cheap Trick into an enjoyable blend of lush, harmonised power pop. Manning and Sturmer were joined on Bellybutton by guitarist Jason Falker, who left before its followup, as Manning and Sturmer didn’t allow him to write songs for the group.

It’s the more stripped down songs on Bellybutton that make the strongest impression; ‘I Wanna Stay Home’ is pretty and poignant, while ‘Baby’s Coming Back’ bounces along like a 1960s bubblegum pop single. Songs like ‘Now She Knows She’s Wrong’ and ‘That Is Why’ showcase the band’s detailed harmony arrangements.

Bellybutton is good in its own right, but it also feels like a dry run for 1993’s more expansive and more impressive Spilt Milk.

 

 

Spilt Milk

Jellyfish Spilt Milk1993, 9.5/10
Bellybutton was a likeable debut from Jellyfish, but Split Milk raises the ante significantly, with more memorable songs, more complex arrangements, and more punchy guitars. While their sound is comparable to many prominent bands, and there are traces of The Beach Boys on ‘Sebrina, Paste, and Plato’ and of XTC, Spilt Milk feels most influenced by Queen, with the big harmonies and hard guitar textures. While the core of the band – the song-writing team of Sturmer and Manning – is intact from Bellybutton, the rest of the band has changed, with new players on guitar and bass, while Jon Brion also provides some guitar.

Spilt Milk hits its straps on songs like ‘Glutton of Sympathy’ and ‘New Mistake’, which combine huge vocal hooks, stacks of harmonies, and detailed arrangements, producing some of the most intoxicating pop songs of the 1990s. There’s also the opening 1-2 punch of the gentle ‘Hush’ leading into the rock of ‘Joining A Fan Club’, and more brilliant pop of ‘The Ghost At Number One’. Spilt Milk tails off a little as it explores more esoteric territory; the album benefits from the diversity, but songs like ‘Russian Hill’ aren’t as memorable as the huge, hooky sound that Jellyfish major in.

Spilt Milk is a power pop classic, and it contains some of the most irresistible pop songs of the 1990s.

 

 

Ten Favourite Jellyfish songs

Glutton of Sympathy
New Mistake
The Ghost At Number One
Joining a Fan Club
I Wanna Stay Home
That Is Why
Too Much, Too Little, Too Late
Baby’s Coming Back
He’s My Best Friend
Worthless Heart

3 thoughts on “Jellyfish Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: