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The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones Album Reviews

It’s widely acknowledged that The Rolling Stones hit their peak between 1968 and 1972 – right now I’m covering those albums, and a few later highlights, as my Top Rated Albums list feels incomplete without them. I’ll come back and cover their 1965-1967 albums later; there are a few that I’ve only recently become acquainted with. I’m also considering filling up the gaps up to 1981, although the albums I’ve skipped generally have a poor reputation.

While the Mick Jagger and Keith Richards team is obviously the nucleus of The Rolling Stones, the band also benefited from the production of Jimmy Miller, and the skills of lead guitarist Mick Taylor, who replaced Brian Jones around the time that 1969’s Let It Bleed was recorded. To some extent The Rolling Stones’ have become caricatures of themselves, but like most celebrated bands, they earned their reputation, and their run of albums between 1968 and 1972 is magnificent.

Rolling Stones Studio Albums: 1965-1981

The Rolling Stones No. 2
Out of Our Heads
December’s Children (And Everybody’s)
Aftermath
Between the Buttons
Their Satanic Majesties Request
Beggars Banquet
Let It Bleed
Sticky Fingers
Exile on Main St.
Goats Head Soup
It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll
Black and Blue
Some Girls
Emotional Rescue
Tattoo You

Ten Favourite Rolling Stones’ songs

Sway
Gimme Shelter
Brown Sugar
Sympathy For The Devil
Torn and Frayed
Tumbling Dice
Salt of the Earth
You Can’t Always Get What You Want
Lady Jane
Miss You

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Beggar’s Banquet – The Rolling Stones

1968, 9.5/10. After dabbling with pop and psychedelia, The Rolling Stones returned to their blues roots.

Let It Bleed – The Rolling Stones

1969, 8.5/10. ‘Gimme Shelter’ was creepy and ‘Midnight Rambler’ was edgy, forming the soundtrack for the tragic Altamont stabbings.

Sticky Fingers – The Rolling Stones

1971, 10/10. At the turn of the 1970s, The Stones delivered Sticky Fingers, an album steeped in sex, drugs, and rock and roll.

Exile on Main St. – The Rolling Stones

1972, 10/10. Exile On Main Street has so much swagger and mystique about it, encapsulating much of the appeal of rock and roll.

Goat’s Head Soup – The Rolling Stones

1973, 7.5/10. Goat’s Head Soup is widely seen as a return to the pack by The Rolling Stones, after a few years of outstanding releases.

Some Girls – The Rolling Stones

1978, 6/10. A more energetic effort with new wave and disco influences, but thin beyond the great singles ‘Miss You’ and ‘Beast of Burden’.

Tattoo You – The Rolling Stones

1981, 8/10. An album of outtakes is my favourite of the post 1972 Rolling Stones albums that I’m familiar with.

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