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Crosby, Stills & Nash

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young Deja Vu

Crosby, Stills & Nash Album Reviews

David Crosby, Stephen Stills, and Graham Nash all started their careers in other notable sixties bands; Crosby left The Byrds after disagreements over counter-cultural songs like ‘Triad’ and ‘Mind Gardens’, Stills’ Buffalo Springfield broke up after tensions with band-mate Neil Young, while Nash left The Hollies after their decision to record a Dylan covers album. The trio’s alliance was always fragile – after 1969’s self-titled debut and 1970’s Déjà Vu, they split over Stills’ and Nash’s mutual pursuit of Rita Coolidge. The trio didn’t reunite in the studio until 1977’s CSN, and while CSN and its 1982 followup Daylight Again are both respectable, mature efforts, it feels like the group didn’t stay together long enough in their prime to meet their potential.

The group are known for their harmonies – Crosby was the harmony specialist in the Byrds, while Nash’s tenor voice was an important part of the Hollies’ blend. They’re also primarily associated with an acoustic sound – their debut especially is very low key and acoustic, and along with The Band and Bob Dylan they were significant in popularising a more roots-based sound in that late 1960s.

Stephen Stills is arguably one of the most overlooked talents of his era – as a musician, producer, and writer, he anchored a series of great albums in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

I’ve covered the group’s first four albums together, plus some of the individual members’ most noteworthy solo efforts and collaborations in the 1970s. Of the extra-curricular efforts, Stills’ 1972 album Manassas is well worth tracking down.

Ten Favourite Crosby, Stills and Nash (and Young) Songs

Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
Ohio
Carry On
Our House
Southern Cross
Find The Cost of Freedom
Guinnevere
Dark Star
Déjà Vu
Shadow Captain

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Crosby, Stills & Nash 1969 Debut

Crosby, Stills & Nash – Crosby, Stills & Nash

1969, 8.5/10. The hippie lyrics are sometimes dated, but Crosby, Stills and Nash’s debut album is finely crafted.

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young Deja Vu

Déjà Vu – Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young

1970, 9.5/10. While Crosby, Stills and Nash would continue to make good music, they were never as culturally relevant again.

Stephen Stills 1970 Solo Album

Stephen Stills – Stephen Stills

1970, 8/10. After leading Buffalo Springfield and Crosby, Stills, and Nash, Stephen Stills finally made his own solo record in 1970.

David Crosby If I Could Only Remember My Name

If I Could Only Remember My Name – David Crosby

1971, 8/10. If I Could Only Remember My Name is the mostly fondly remembered record from the first wave of Crosby, Stills, and Nash solo albums,

Graham Nash Songs for Beginners

Songs for Beginners – Graham Nash

1971, 7.5/10. Graham Nash is often perceived as the lightweight of Crosby, Stills, and Nash, so it’s surprising how accomplished his 1971 solo debut is.

Stephen Stills Manassas

Manassas – Stephen Stills’ Manassas

1972, 8.5/10. Stephen Stills’ Manassas is an excellent double album that’s been over-looked by many music fans.

David Crosby Graham Nash Wind of the Water

Wind on the Water – Crosby & Nash

1975, 6.5/10. Crosby and Nash collaborated on three records in the mid-seventies – Wind on the Water is their second album together.

Crosby Stills and Nash CSN

CSN – Crosby, Stills & Nash

1977, 8/10. CSN isn’t as effortlessly vital as the unit’s first two albums, but it showcases mature songs.

Crosby, Stills and Nash Daylight Again

Daylight Again – Crosby, Stills & Nash

1982, 7.5/10. Daylight Again is stronger and has aged more gracefully than you’d expect from a 1982 Crosby, Stills & Nash album.