Skip to content

Wednesday Morning 3AM – Simon and Garfunkel

Wednesdqay Morning 3.a.m. Simon and Garfunkel

Wednesday Morning 3 AM

(1964), 3.5/10
After releasing singles in the 1950s as Tom and Jerry, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel re-emerged in the sixties folk movement with 1964’s Wednesday Morning 3AM. Their debut is a very strait-laced traditional folk album, featuring fare such as the Christmas carol ‘Go Tell It On The Mountain’ and the shanty ‘Peggy-O’. The nadir is a lively cover of Dylan’s ‘The Times They Are A-Changin”, which misses the nastiness of the original.

Wednesday Morning 3.A.M. is an inauspicious debut, and apart from Garfunkel’s harmony vocals, the only thing to distinguish it is Simon’s original compositions; the original acoustic version of ‘The Sound of Silence’ only needed some rock band overdubs to make it a hit single, while the low key title track is also pleasant.

Apart from Simon’s two original songs, Wednesday Morning 3AM feels like the work of a long forgotten folk duo, and it’s more of a historical curiosity than an essential part of their oeuvre.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Lord Eels Music

S'baht music

timeweleftthisworldtoday

This world's so mixed up everywhere you go

The Immortal Jukebox

A Blog about Music and Popular Culture

Iconic Rock Talk Show

Music, music media, and that crazy Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Pop Culture Thoughts

Short reviews of pop culture stuff from a lifelong over-indulger.

Blunderstorms

Integrating the platforms of the needs of the synergies of the client experience vertical horizontal paradigm

The All Scene Eye

Music and Media

%d bloggers like this: